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EPISODE 56

Should You Start a Podcast for Your Teacher Seller Business? with Sara Whittaker

START A PODCAST

Have you ever wondered if starting a podcast would add value to your business? You might be unsure about what of tech is involved, what kind of time investment it will be, and whether or not it’s even worth it. In today’s episode, we’re giving you all the details of what to consider when it comes to determining if podcasting is right for you!

Our guest, Sara Whittaker, is a teacher turned podcast strategist and the host of the Podcasting for Educators podcast. She helps teachers and TPT sellers start and leverage podcasting to grow their businesses and connect deeper with their audience. 

Tune in to hear us dig into the benefits of podcasting as a TPT seller, how to know whether or not it’s the right move for you at this time, what you need to get started, and Sara’s practical first steps for getting started. 

02:21  The most common reasons that people decide to start podcasting

09:13  The most significant benefits of starting a podcast as a Teacher or TPT Seller

11:44 – Two questions to get clear on before committing to a podcast

17:29 – Essential items and programs needed to get your podcast started

Our Guest on This Episode:

start-a-podcast Sara Whittaker is a teacher turned podcast strategist. She helps educators leverage the power of podcasting in order to build brand awareness, scale their business, and connect with their audience. Sara is also the host of the podcast, Podcasting for Educators, where she shares weekly tips on how to start, manage, and grow a podcast.

Listen to Sara’s Podcast 

Visit Sara’s Website and Courses

Connect on Instagram

Kristen
Hey y’all and welcome back to another episode of the savvy teacher Seller. I’m your host, Kristen Doyle and today I am so happy to have my podcast manager Sara Whittaker back with us for a second week in a row.

Kristen
She is here to talk this week about starting a podcast. Sara is a teacher turned podcast strategist, and she helps teachers and TPT sellers like you leverage your podcast, to grow your business, to build brand awareness and to connect with your audience. She also is the host of the podcast called podcasting for educators, where she shares so many helpful tips about how to start and grow your podcast.

Kristen
In this episode, we are digging in to how podcasts can help your business. Whether or not it’s the right move for you right now and some of the tech and just some practical tips for getting started. So if you have ever wondered, if a podcast is right for you, or maybe you’ve already decided that you think it is then this episode is for you. Let’s dive in.

Kristen
Hey, TPT sellers ready to seek growth in your business? You’re in the right place. Welcome to the savvy teacher seller. I’m Kristen Doyle. And I’m here to give you no fluff tools and strategies that will really make an impact on your sale. Let’s get started y’all.

Kristen
Hey, Sara, welcome back for week two of our little podcast series.

Sara Whittaker
Thank you so much. It’s so good to be back. We should just start our own show.

Kristen
I know I joked earlier the Sara and Kristen show we can do a whole thing.

Sara Whittaker
A whole Summer Series. I love it.

Kristen
Well, last week, we talked about kind of my experience with podcasting. And I wanted to have you back to talk about the whole process kind of of launching a podcast and maybe adding that in to some of my listeners businesses. So let’s dive right in.

Kristen
Let’s talk about why people are adding a podcast to their business in the first place. And I shared last week why I did it. But what are some other reasons that people decide to start podcasting?

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, absolutely. So in case you missed last week, Kristin talked about how one of the reasons that she wanted to start a podcast is, it’s an alternative to blogging or it’s something that you can do in addition to your blogging to continue just driving even more traffic to your website. And that is definitely one of the top reasons that people that I work with start a podcast. They’ve been blogging, sitting down at the computer writing a blog post from scratch for years. And they’re just really ready to try something new to have another type of long form content that they can create, and still have on their website.

Sara Whittaker
Because if you do a podcast and you have shownotes, those will live on your website. And a lot of people just find it a lot easier to verbally get their ideas out versus sitting down and typing something from scratch. So that’s definitely one of the big reasons.

Sara Whittaker
Another big reason would be that a lot of people might be feeling a little burnt out with putting all of their efforts into places like Instagram, or Facebook or Tik Tok, any kind of social media. And they know that they still need to connect with their audience in some way and really have that visibility online, but they don’t want to show their face on Instagram stories. They don’t want to create reels all the time, they just don’t want to be on Instagram 24/7. But they know they still need to show up.

Sara Whittaker
So a podcast can kind of take some of that weight away and allow you to I’m not saying that you should just cancel your Instagram account or anything like that. But if you have a podcast that you’re releasing episodes with weekly, that’s a really great way to show up for people and to support people and let them get to know you without necessarily being on Instagram all the time. So that’s a big reason.

Sara Whittaker
Another perk would be to build your email list. It’s a great lead generator to have a podcast, it’s a place that you can promote your opt ins, and really explain the why behind things that you’re selling as well as opt-ins that you have. So that’s another big piece.

Sara Whittaker
And then I say the other really big one is that it just allows you to get to know your audience and allows your audience to get to know you. So it’s a way to make your content super accessible for people. A lot of you listening are probably serving people like teachers and speech pathologists and you know all of these people who work in schools and what better way to serve them and to support them, then allowing them to listen to your content on their time, not attached to their phone or their computer, they can kind of just pop their earbuds in or listen in their car or on their lunch break.

Kristen
I know when I was teaching that drive to school, every morning, I had about a 30 minute commute both ways. And so that was my podcast time, I would pop the podcasts in when I first got in the car and usually be done by the time I got to school, and I have ideas and I’m excited about things. Sometimes maybe it threw off my plans for the day because I got a great new idea. And I wanted to do it now.

Kristen
But that’s the nice thing about as you can listen, wherever you are, whatever you’re doing, it’s not a stop and have to sit down and read this thing, because let’s just be real, if I have to read it, I’m going to skim it. And I’m not going to get everything that you wanted me to get out of it.

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, for sure. I know podcasters who kind of treat their podcasts like PD. They have like groups of teachers who will listen to their episodes. And then they’ll kind of get together kind of like a book club, but a podcast club, and they’ll discuss their episodes and, you know, use their resources that were mentioned in the episode. So many cool things that are happening. Like I said that content is just so much more accessible.

Kristen
I think that’s such a great way to grow your audience to I mean, you could build lead magnets around podcast playlists for specific PD topics for teachers and things like that.

Sara Whittaker
Yes, absolutely.

Kristen
You know how there are questions in the back of certain books for the book club conversation?

Sara Whittaker
Yes.

Kristen
That would make a great lead magnet for a podcast series that you have, where you have kind of some podcast club questions that teachers can talk through and use them like PD.

Sara Whittaker
Yeah. And you can even create PD certificates and they can earn credits from listening to your episodes. I’ve had people do that too, which is just so cool. It’s PD that people actually want to attend.

Kristen
Yeah. No getting dressed up. No showing up at school in the summer.

Sara Whittaker
Exactly. Poolside PD.

Kristen
Yeah. So you mentioned not necessarily wanting to crank out new content for Instagram as a reason that people start a podcast. And I thought while you were talking, I thought, yeah, but that’s actually one of the benefits of the podcast, because I don’t feel like I have to crank out new content for Instagram now because I have it. The podcast is the content for Instagram, it all flows together so well.

Sara Whittaker
Yes, that’s so so true. It’s kind of this long form content that you can have that you then use throughout the entire week. So if you think about the content that you release, maybe you put out your episodes on Mondays, that’s your social media content, that’s your weekly newsletter, you’ve got everything, right there.

Kristen
Yeah. And it’s long term kinds of content as well, like blog posts are it lives forever, it doesn’t get lost down the Instagram feed rabbit hole somewhere. It’s that long form content that you can keep promoting later to. I mean, we pretty frequently go back and reshare old episodes when something is happening. You know, for example, I have an episode about what to do before TPT sales. I put that out last July or August ish in preparation for back to school sales, and we put that content back out on Instagram, every time a sale is coming, because I know you still need to do these things. Because it’s why I do every sale not just the back to school season.

Sara Whittaker
Yes, such a good point. Yeah, your podcast episodes only continued to gain more traction over time, which is very different than you know, say in an Instagram post or something like that. You can take podcast episodes and embed them into any kind of welcome sequences that you have for your email list or for lead magnets. And it also gives you content if you’re on Pinterest, your show notes, then for every episode, it just it gives you more content to then go and pin on Pinterest too.

Kristen
And it’s such easy content to create to if this is something that you enjoy anyway.

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, for sure. Most people say that it’s just easier and faster to just sit down and talk about what you want to talk about versus writing it all out.

Kristen
There’s not as much pressure for it to be perfect, which is a really nice kind of a weight off. But it also speeds up the process because you don’t have to write it and rewrite it and over analyze every sentence and all of those things.

Sara Whittaker
Yes, absolutely.

Kristen
Any other benefit of adding a podcast to your business?

Sara Whittaker
I think that a podcast is just in itself kind of a natural authority builder as well. When people see that you have a podcast, I’ve had people get lots of speaking opportunities because they have a podcast and just kind of building your brand awareness as a whole. People see you as more of that authority figure. It kind of sets you apart from maybe other people who do similar things as you in your niche. That’s definitely a big heard as well. And then you know, you’re getting more content out online, which is really great for SEO and for discoverability as a whole.

Kristen
Yeah, I’m sure we’ve probably all heard your customers are supposed to know like and trust you, or that they need to in order to become your customers. And I think podcasts really hits on all three of those. Because you are out in the world more often in more places. It gives you lots of opportunities to guests on other shows and things like that. So you’re building your audience that way. And they get to know you better through audio, even if you’re not using video as well, just through the audio and hearing your voice. They feel like they get to know you better. They learn to like you. And of course, you’re sharing helpful content that’s building that trust as well.

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, absolutely. There’s so many opportunities for relationship building, like you can have your listeners on as guests for your show, which is really cool. A really unique way to build relationships with your audience. Collaborations with other podcasters is really great. And I mean, when you guest on other podcasts, that’s just a great way to build your audience as a whole to.

Kristen
Yeah, so if someone is thinking about podcasting, how would you say that they can know if this is a good move for them or not?

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, so a few things I would consider if you are wondering if podcasting is right for you, number one, I would say that you need to have a really clearly defined audience and message. So getting really crystal clear on who you are speaking to, so that you can really cater your content to that ideal person.

Sara Whittaker
So rather than just talking to teachers, like what grade what subjects are you going to talk about really narrowing in on the content that you’re going to create, so that when somebody discovers your podcast, they’ll really feel like every episode is made for them. And they’ll want to tune in to every single one of your episodes so that you can build that trust faster. And so that it really is a customer journey, that you’re then taking them on the resources that you’re sharing in your episodes, and things like that will apply to them.

Sara Whittaker
So getting really clear on who your audience is, ideally having something that you’re selling, whether that’s your TPT resources, a course, a membership, at the very minimum, having an email list somewhere that you can drive people to in your episodes. That you can have those call to actions for people for people to take after listening to your episodes, because if you have their attention, and they’re listening to you, you want to be able to have them take that next step.

Kristen
Absolutely. I know a lot of people ask about different next steps they might want to take in their business. A lot of times people feel like I shouldn’t do this unless I have like a membership or a course or something big like that, that they’re selling. But I think for a podcast, really, as long as you have something to offer that’s paid, it really doesn’t matter what it is or how much it costs, those small products can add up really quickly. And you’re building such a great group of people who are really devoted to following you, and hopefully then are following your TPT store just as much as they’re following your podcast.

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, absolutely. And totally okay, if you don’t have a course or membership, if you do have a TPT store, you can really focus on promoting individual resources, but also bundles. If you have bundles, that’s a great thing to put your energy towards for episodes too. And you can always be switching things up in terms of what you’re promoting inside of your episodes too.

Sara Whittaker
And then another really important thing to consider if you’re thinking about starting a podcast is to really be honest with yourself about whether or not you have the time to devote to the podcast. Because if you’re going to start this thing you want to do it right, you want it to be something that’s going to serve you and your audience long term. And so you really need to think about okay, do I have the time to consistently sit down and record episodes? Is this something that you’re going to do by yourself? Are you going to outsource any of the process? And really think about that, that’s really going to determine if this is going to work long term for you or not.

Kristen
Yeah, and I will say one thing I wasn’t really clear on before I started that I know now, that pockets episodes don’t have to be very long. And I know my audience probably says, Well, yeah, obviously because my episodes are pretty short. But what I have learned is I think before I started my podcast, I was used to listening to 45 minute to 60 minute long episodes. And sometimes that would take me that whole drive to school and then back home before I finish the entire thing, but it seems like now a lot of podcasters have gone in the shorter direction.

Kristen
I know that’s definitely What works best for my audience. But those shorter episodes, I mean, if you don’t have to do a whole lot of planning ahead of time, then it’s just the 15 minutes that you sit down and do your recording, and then however long it takes you to edit and all of those things. But it definitely isn’t as big as I thought it was gonna be in terms of how much time I’m spending on it.

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, that’s a great point. I mean, the length of your episodes is huge. Because if you can do those and stick to that 15 minute timeframe, and I think that’s just like the perfect length for probably most of our audiences because that’s like the average commute to work, average every time somebody gets in their car to go to the grocery store, drop their kid off at school. 15 minutes is just a sweet spot. So they can actually get through the whole episode. Because if you’ve got those really long episodes, then they might listen to half of it and then forget to come back to it.

Kristen
Yeah, most of the time. 15 minutes gives me plenty of time to get through the content I want to without adding a whole lot of fluff and let’s just be real. We’re all busy. And we don’t have time to listen to somebody ramble for 20 minutes before they ever start talking about the thing that’s important.

Sara Whittaker
Yes, I just surveyed my Instagram audience. And I was sharing their answers in one of my podcast episodes. And the number one thing that people said was annoying to them as a podcast listener, is when people just ramble about nothing, and the episode could be cut in half, and they’re halfway through and they still haven’t gotten to the meat of the episode.

Kristen
I definitely feel that. That’s why my episodes are what they’re 10 to 15 minutes if they’re solo episodes, and I try to stick to under 30 for guest episodes. Obviously, they’re a little longer because we’re having back and forth conversation.

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, absolutely. The other perk of shorter episodes, something that is kind of a pain point for some podcasters. And you might even feel this way on Instagram, or if you’re writing blog post is, okay, how do I differentiate my podcast content from content that’s maybe inside of one of my resources or inside of my course. And keeping your episodes shorter is a really great way to hold yourself accountable to not giving away everything that’s in other places of your business?

Kristen
Yeah, absolutely. And that’s definitely been something that has been helpful for me, because sometimes, I tend to be one of those people who wants to go really deep into everything and make sure I get the whole picture out. But sometimes we need to not do that. Because it’s really not fair to people who have bought a course or they’re in your membership or whatever, it’s not really fair for them, who’ve paid for something for you to give it away to everybody else. So definitely, keeping that episode short, helps just not let you get too far into the weeds.

Sara Whittaker
Yes, 100%.

Kristen
It’s also kind of a different audience. Most of the time, people who are listening to your podcast versus people who are taking your course, they’re usually at a different level in terms of whatever the thing is that you talk about the most. And so sharing that kind of basic level stuff on your podcast is a perfect place for them to start without getting overwhelmed.

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, and you have to remember that most people who are listening are multitasking. So they’re driving or they’re doing things around the house. So if you’re giving out all of this, like super detailed step by step by step information, they’re probably not actually retaining it at that moment.

Kristen
They’re going to have to come back and listen to it again, or find the transcript in your show notes, right? And try to remember what it was you said to do.

Kristen
Well, let’s talk a little bit about the tech because I was honestly really surprised at how little I needed to get started. And even at things like the price points, I thought I needed, like a super fancy microphone. And I’ve heard about these, like, I don’t even know what to call them, like sound boards for balancing the audio and things. And I was really surprised at how simple it is to get started and a year in, I am still using a really basic setup, and it’s working great. So let’s talk about what kind of tech you need to run a podcast.

Sara Whittaker
Yes, I know this is something that’s super intimidating for people, they think that they have to like set up this huge podcast studio in their house and definitely not the case. So the really big things that you need are a microphone. Like Kristin said, I’ll give you a list that you can put in the show notes for people so that it will link to everything that I’m mentioning, but you can get everything on Amazon. I love it’s called the ATR 2100x. It’s a USB mic that you can just plug right into your computer and turn the on button on and voila, it is ready to go ready for you to record.

Sara Whittaker
For your headphones, like Kristin uses air pods and that’s worked really well for you. So you can use air pods or you can use like I have corded headphones does not have to be anything fancy. It could literally be the like, old headphones that you know come in the iPhone case that you probably have 10 pairs of lying around your house somewhere. And in that case, it would just plug into the back of your mic. And then like I said, the mic plugs into your computer. And that’s it as far as like necessary actual physical equipment.

Sara Whittaker
The bonus item, I would say is what’s called a boom arm. And that attaches to your desk or to your table. And your mic can go right inside of it just so you can kind of like adjust the level depending on how tall your chair is. You don’t have to use your hands.

Kristen
One less thing on your desk in your way.

Sara Whittaker
Absolutely, yes, some of the mics will come with like a little stand that sits on your desk, but those tend to be a little bit flimsy. And they can sometimes like cause some noise. And I mean, that’s really it, mic headphones, and boom arm.

Sara Whittaker
And then as far as tech like platforms that you need on your computer, you can record on a platform that’s created specifically for podcasters like Zencaster, which is what Kristin and I are on right now. Zencaster and Riverside, those are like the two really popular platforms for recording. And you can record video and audio that way. And then zoom is another one that people use, people are super familiar with. Sometimes zoom can be a little bit glitchy, which is why I recommend Zencaster just because it does tend to have higher quality than zoom.

Sara Whittaker
And then if you’re not doing video and you’re doing a solo episode, I use a program called audacity, which is totally free, you download it right onto your desktop. And you can record and edit with Audacity. So those are like the big things in terms of tech. And regardless of which platform you use, whether it’s Zen caster or audacity, there’s a button that will show you if your mic is plugged in. And then you just push the record button and you start talking. It is seriously as simple as that. When it comes to tech, just record and then push stop when you’re done. Zencaster you can even hook up it integrates with your Google Drive. So when you are done recording, it will put it into your Google Drive for you, which is a really cool feature.

Kristen
It really is a pretty low tech kind of thing. It doesn’t take very much, I was really surprised. I think I spent under $100 Total between the mic and the boom arm and the little filter. And I was set up and I’m still using the ones I bought last year. They’re been fantastic. My mic has not left it’s boom arm and in a year. I just push it out of the way behind my monitor and when I’m not recording and pull it back in front when it’s time to go.

Sara Whittaker
Yes, absolutely. If you are planning to do your own editing, like you’re not going to outsource that part and you’re doing it on your own. I do also recommend using a website called auphonic. And what that does is after you’re done editing, you can run it through a phonic and it will really level everything out, which is extremely helpful for guest interviews, especially because you might have experienced, like, maybe you’re in your car listening to a podcast, and it’s a guest episode. So maybe there’s two or three people on the episode, and one person will talk and they’re really, really quiet. And then you have to like turn up the volume to hear the other person. It’s so frustrating to listen to. But auphonic will take care of that part for you.

Kristen
And I’ve been using a really cool AI tool for video editing. But I’m sure you could do it for podcasts if you’re trying to do your own, called descript. Have you used it?

Sara Whittaker
I’ve played with it.

Kristen
I love that it transcribes for you. And you can delete parts of the video by words. So if I find like a sentence that I messed up on, and I had to repeat it, I can delete that sentence by highlighting the words on the transcript. It’s so easy to do. And of course, I have you doing all of my podcast production. I don’t think I could possibly live without you at this point. It would not get done. But that is another good option if you have to do it yourself too.

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, definitely. I know tons of people who use Descript. And we’ll link it in the show notes. They have a great kind of like preview trailer on their website that shows you all of the cool features. There’s a lot of really neat things that you can do with that. And I’ve never tried the video editing on there. But I’ve heard it’s great.

Kristen
Yeah, that’s what I’ve used for all of my last round of course updates. So all of those videos got edited in descript. And it was just fantastic.

Sara Whittaker
Oh, that’s so smart. Yeah. The other thing I don’t know if we can categorize this as tech or not, but the big other thing would be some sort of project management tool. So whether that’s Asana, ClickUp, Monday, something to really keep track of all of your tasks, set due dates for yourself. Especially if you’re going to be doing this on your own so that you can really stay on top of everything and make sure that you’re not falling behind and have a little checklist for each episode.

Kristen
Yeah, absolutely. That is so helpful for me to especially planning out my content because I try to plan out content six months or so at a time. And so I’ll plug them in. And then I have to go back sometimes and think like, what am I supposed to be doing this week? Because I don’t always remember. So it’s really helpful to have it in there even after an episode has been scheduled sometimes, you know, we schedule ahead. And so by the time it’s going to air every now and then I don’t remember what this week’s episode is, because I recorded it a few weeks ago, and they get a little jumbled up. So super helpful to have everything in one place in some kind of tool to help you manage it all.

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, definitely. And like Kristin just said, a great thing is that you can get ahead, you can schedule your episodes ahead of time, so that you can kind of do a batch of episodes if you want get those scheduled. And then you know, you don’t have to worry about it for a few weeks.

Kristen
So we have been kind of gushing about how wonderful podcasting is for two episodes. Now, If someone who’s listening is thinking that they are ready to take this leap and get started with a podcast, what would you suggest that they do first? What are some of those first steps to take?

Sara Whittaker
Yeah, so if you are like 100%, I’m ready to do this thing. Usually people are like, Okay, I’m ready. I’m going to start tomorrow, like we’re launching next week. I really recommend that you take some time you sit down, and you really give yourself four to six weeks, from the time that you say, Okay, I’m ready to do this until your launch date.

Sara Whittaker
So that will really give you the time to make sure that you have things in place like your project management, like all of your episode topics. And you’re really giving yourself that time to get ahead, when it comes time for you to actually launch your podcast. And for you to get your episodes out, I highly recommend having like 10 episodes recorded before that day even comes so that you’re already ahead before you even get started.

Sara Whittaker
Because that’s a place that people kind of run into some trouble, they start their podcast super quickly, it launches, everything seems great, they’re really excited. And then they realize they have to continue keeping up with it. So if you can get yourself ahead from the beginning, it’s going to serve you so well. So like I said, I would sit down to set a date for yourself, give that four to six week timeline so that you do have that time to get everything prepared.

Sara Whittaker
Also, I think it’s really helpful if you don’t already have some sort of, I know people call it different things content, pillar content buckets, that you can kind of categorize all of your content into sit down, it can be on a piece of paper, it can be on your project management tool. But think about those content pillars, those main categories of things that you talk about in your business, and list out as many episode topics as you can for each of those categories, so that you have so many ideas before you even get started. And if you’ve been blogging for the past few years, that’s a great place to start is to take some of your blog posts and just turn them into podcast episodes. It’s a really good way to get yourself started and an easy way to get started.

Kristen
Yeah, and especially for some of that content that maybe is a little bit dated now maybe something has changed about the way we’re teaching that topic or something like that, then this is a really great way to give that content a refresh, but not have to start from scratch either.

Sara Whittaker
Yes, definitely. If you’re going to have guests on your show, I would try and line up those interviews ahead of time and get those systems in place. Schedule your interviews so that you can just have all of those things recorded way ahead of time to set yourself up for success.

Kristen
And what Sara’s not saying is listen to her podcast.

Sara Whittaker
Oh, absolutely. Yes, I will put a link, I have a whole series actually in my podcast that will walk you through some more detailed steps about what exactly you should do in the weeks leading up to your podcast launch. So lots of the things that we talked about. And then some and there is a launch guide that goes along with that kind of like a free workbook so that you can really go step by step by step as you listen to those episodes.

Kristen
That was exactly how I got started looking at your launch guide. That’s where I went shopping on Amazon to get all the things and so, so helpful.

Sara Whittaker
I know I keep thinking of other things that we haven’t mentioned. I mean, the other thing that you do need is a podcast host. And that’s where you upload your episodes. you schedule your episodes just like you need a host for your website. You need a host for your podcast and that launch guide that we just mentioned, it has my recommendations in it as well. But that can be set up in you know, just a couple of hours.

Kristen
It’s way less intimidating. Getting then a WordPress site for sure.

Sara Whittaker
Most definitely, yeah. And then you can go to Kristen to set up your podcast page on your website.

Kristen
Yeah, I would love to. I have set up quite a few podcasts pages since I started my show. Because a lot of people are adding them to theirs. Or maybe they just had their show notes, kind of as part of their blog, and they want an actual podcast page thing. Super fun. I love doing that.

Kristen
Thank you, Sara so much for being here and giving us all these tips about how to launch podcasts and how to know if it’s right. And all of those things. This has been super, super fun to chat with you these last two episodes. So thank you for doing this.

Sara Whittaker
Thank you so so much for having me, Kristen. It’s been so fun to talk to you for two whole episodes about podcasting. And if anybody is ready to get started on their podcast, and you know that this is going to be something that you’re doing by yourself, I do have an online course that you get lifetime access to, self paced, called the podcasting for educators prep school. And if you’re interested in joining, you can use the code savvy50 for $50 off.

Kristen
Thank you, Sara so much for having that code for us. Of course, I handed off starting my podcast right to you and hired you to do it for me. But having taken your other course I definitely can say that anything you put out there is going to be amazing.

Sara Whittaker
Thank you so much. This has been so much fun.

Kristen
Thank you. That’s it for today’s episode of the savvy teacher seller. I hope you found Sara’s insights on starting a podcast really helpful and enlightening for you. Remember, whatever your niche as a TPT seller podcasting can open so many doors and help you grow your audience in so many ways.

Kristen
So your action step for today. If you are considering starting a podcast is to take that first step like Sarah shared of identifying your niche and beginning to think through the tech that you’ll need and start making some plans for podcasts episodes that you might want to record. After that, I will send you over to Sarah’s podcast to listen to her series on getting started and to grab that freebie that she has with a lots of helpful tips and links to things that you can use to get started on your podcast journey. You’ll find links to all of the tools that we talked about in the show notes for this episode at KristenDoyle.co/episode56.

Kristen
Thank you so much for joining us today and I’ll talk to you soon. I hope you enjoyed today’s episode. If you did, please share it with another teacher seller who would also find it helpful. For more resources on Growing Your TPT business. Head to Kristendoyle.co/TPT. Talk to you soon.

 

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